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Genome-Wide Admixture Mapping of Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate and Chronic Kidney Disease Identifies European and African Ancestry-of-Origin Loci in Hispanic and Latino Individuals in the United States
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology  (IF10.121),  Pub Date : 2022-01-01, DOI: 10.1681/asn.2021050617
Andrea R.V.R. Horimoto, Diane Xue, Jianwen Cai, James P. Lash, Martha L. Daviglus, Nora Franceschini, Timothy A. Thornton

Background

Admixture mapping is a powerful approach for gene mapping of complex traits that leverages the diverse genetic ancestry in populations with recent admixture, such as Hispanic or Latino individuals in the United States. These individuals have an increased risk of CKD.

Methods

We performed genome-wide admixture mapping for both CKD and eGFR in a sample of 12,601 participants from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, with validation in a sample of 8191 Black participants from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). We also compared the findings with those from a conventional genome-wide association study.

Results

Three novel ancestry-of-origin loci were identified on chromosomes 2, 14, and 15 for CKD and eGFR. The chromosome 2 locus comprises two European ancestry regions encompassing the FSHR and NRXN1 genes, with European ancestry at this locus associated with increased CKD risk. The chromosome 14 locus, found within the DLK1-DIO3 imprinted domain, was associated with lower eGFR and driven by European ancestry. The eGFR-associated locus on chromosome 15 included intronic variants of RYR3 and was within an African-specific genomic region associated with higher eGFR. The genome-wide association study failed to identify significant associations in these regions. We validated the chromosome 14 and 15 loci associated with eGFR in the WHI Black participants.

Conclusions

This study provides evidence of shared ancestry-specific genomic regions influencing eGFR in Hispanic or Latino individuals and Black individuals and illustrates the potential for leveraging genetic ancestry in recently admixed populations for the discovery of novel candidate loci for kidney phenotypes.