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Evolution and Regulation of a Large Effector Family of Pyricularia oryzae
Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions  (IF4.171),  Pub Date : 2021-02-09, DOI: 10.1094/mpmi-07-20-0210-r
Daniel J. Ebbole, Meilian Chen, Zhenhui Zhong, Nicholas Farmer, Wenhui Zheng, Yijuan Han, Guodong Lu, Zonghua Wang

Plant pathogen effectors play important roles in parasitism, including countering plant immunity. However, investigations of the emergence and diversification of fungal effectors across host-adapted populations has been limited. We previously identified a gene encoding a suppressor of plant cell death in Pyricularia oryzae (syn. Magnaporthe oryzae). Here, we report the gene is one of a 21-member gene family and we characterize sequence diversity in different populations. Within the rice pathogen population, nucleotide diversity is low, however; the majority of gene family members display presence-absence polymorphism or other null alleles. Gene family allelic diversity is greater between host-adapted populations and, thus, we named them host-adapted genes (HAGs). Multiple copies of HAGs were found in some genome assemblies and sequence divergence between the alleles in two cases suggested they were the result of repeat-induced point mutagenesis. Transfer of family members between populations and novel HAG haplotypes resulting from apparent recombination were observed. HAG family transcripts were induced in planta and a subset of HAGs are dependent on a key regulator of pathogenesis, PMK1. We also found differential intron splicing for some HAGs that would prevent ex planta protein expression. For some genes, spliced transcript was expressed in antiphase with an overlapping antisense transcript. Characterization of HAG expression patterns and allelic diversity reveal novel mechanisms for HAG regulation and mechanisms generating sequence diversity and novel allele combinations. This evidence of strong in planta–specific expression and selection operating on the HAG family is suggestive of a role in parasitism.

Copyright © 2021 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.